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Peroneal tendinopathy

September 12 | 2017
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Peroneal tendinopathy Peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tendonitis is characterized by an aching pain and swelling in the perineal tendons. These are located in the lower, outside portion of the ankle. A tendon is soft-tissue that attaches a muscle to a bone. The muscles involved in this condition are the 2 peroneal muscles in the lower leg, called the peroneus longus and the peroneus brevis. ¬ Anatomy ​There are two peroneal tendons that run along the back of the fibula. The first is called the peroneus brevis. The term “brevis” implies short.  It is called this because it has a shorter muscle and starts lower in the leg. It then runs down around the back of the bone called the fibula on the outside of the leg and connects to the side of the foot.  The peroneus longus takes its name because it has a longer course. It starts higher on the leg…

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De Quervain’s Disease

August 12 | 2017
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De Quervain’s Disease/ Texting thumb. De Quervain’s Disease De Quervain’s Disease or nowadays known as texting thumb is a painful inflammation of tendons in the thumb that extend to the wrist. The rubbing of the inflamed tendon against the canal it passes through causes pain at the base of the thumb and into the lower arm. It is commonly seen in females over 40 years of age. Causes of De Quervain’s Disease 1. Simple strain injury to the tendon. 2. Repetitive motion injury. Workers who perform rapid repetitive activities involving pinching, grasping, pulling or pushing are at increased risk. Specific activities including intensive mousing, trackball use, and typing. Other activities including bowling, golf, fly-fishing, piano-playing, sewing, and knitting can also cause De Quervain’s Disease. 3. Frequent causes of De Quervain’s Disease include stresses such as lifting young children into car seats, lifting heavy grocery bags by…

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Vaginismus

August 12 | 2017
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Vaginismus and Physiotherapy Vaginismus is a painful feeling of discomfort or inability when inserting a tampon, finger, penis or during a doctor’s internal pelvic exam. It occurs when there are involuntary contractions of the muscles in the outer third of the vagina. Primary Vaginismus: when a woman has never been able to have pain free intercourse due to pelvic floor muscle spasm. Secondary Vaginismus: pain that develops sometimes later in life after a traumatic event such as childbirth, surgery, or a medical condition. With Vaginismus, there is usually significant Connective Tissue Dysfunction that needs to be addressed first before any internal work. It is suggested that you follow up the self-help treatment for connective tissue dysfunction before embarking on the stretching exercises with the dilators. Pelvic floor exercises and Desensitisation techniques A physiotherapist may be able to teach you pelvic floor exercises, such as squeezing and releasing your pelvic floor…

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Dyspareunia

August 12 | 2017
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Dyspareunia and Physiotherapy Dyspareunia is genital pain experienced by women just before, during or after sexual intercourse. Some women have always experienced pain with intercourse from their very first attempt. Other women begin to feel pain with intercourse or cyclically with menstruation. They can also have pain after an injury or infection . Sometimes the pain increases over time. When pain occurs, the woman may be distracted from feeling pleasure and excitement. Causes • vaginal dryness from menopause, childbirth, breastfeeding, medications • skin disorders that cause ulcers, cracks, itching, or burning • infections, such as yeast or urinary tract infections • spontaneous tightening of the muscles of the vaginal wall • endometriosis • pelvic inflammatory disease • uterine fibroids • irritable bowel syndrome • radiation and chemotherapy Other factors that affect a woman’s ability to become aroused can also cause dyspareunia. These factors include: • stress, which can result in…

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Hip fracture

August 12 | 2017
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A hip fracture is a break in the upper quarter of the femur (thigh) bone. The extent of the break depends on the forces that are involved. The type of surgery used to treat a hip fracture is based on the bones and soft tissues affected or on the level of the fracture. Older people are at a higher risk of hip fracture because bones tend to weaken with age (osteoporosis). Multiple medications, poor vision and balance problems also make older people more likely to trip and fall — one of the most common causes of hip fracture. ϖ Signs and symptoms of a hip fracture include: • Inability to move immediately after a fall • Severe pain in your hip or groin • Inability to put weight on your leg on the side of your injured hip • Stiffness, bruising and swelling in and around your hip area •…

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