Tag Archives: Physiotherapy Rehabilitation Mississauga

Acupuncture: Neck pain

Acupuncture: Neck pain

Acupuncture: Neck pain

Almost everyone will experience some sort of neck pain or stiffness during their lifetime. However, certain occupations appear to be predisposed to neck symptoms.  Acupuncture: Neck pain may be able to help.

Manual laborers, for instance, have more symptoms than office workers.  The type of work seems to affect the risk. A person’s age and a history of twisting and bending during work can also contribute.

Studies have shown acupuncture: Neck Pain to be effective in relieving certain types of neck pain.  This is especially true for neck pain  caused by whiplash. Some studies suggest acupuncture can treat degenerative neck disorders such as ankylosing spondylosis and cervical spondylosis.  In many cases, acupuncture: Neck pain has worked for patients whose conditions could not be solved using conventional approaches.

¬ Mechanism of action of Acupuncture: Neck pain

  • Release of opioid peptides.

    Opioids are naturally occurring chemicals in the brain that have apain killing effect. The release of these opioids plays a large role in the reduction of pain. There has been lots of evidence to show that acupuncture stimulates the central nervous system.  This causes the release of these pain killing chemicals.

  • Alteration in the secretion of neurotransmitters and neurohormones.

    Acupuncture is said to activate the hypothalamus and pituitary glands. This changes the release of these chemicals. These particular chemicals play a direct role in the feeling of pain. It also affects the activity of an organ . Evidence has shown that acupuncture alters this secretion in a manner that reduces pain.

  • Stimulation of electromagnetic points on the body. The 2,000 points of the body that acupuncture focuses on are thought to be special conductors of electromagnetic signals. Stimulation of these areas is believed to start the flow of endorphins—the body’s natural painkillers.

    ¬ Indications for Acupuncture: Neck pain

    • Sudden Force/Automobile Accident
    • Degenerative Disc Disease
    • Overuse/Improper Use
    • Osteoporosis
    • Neck Strain
    • Degenerative Arthritis
    • Whiplash
    • Muscle Tension or Spasm
    • Bone Spur
    • Herniated or Protruding Disk
    • Pinched Nerve
    • Ligament/Muscle Tears
    • Cervical Spondylosis
    • Ankylosing Spondylosis

    ¬ Contraindications of Acupuncture: Neck pain

    There are very few situations where acupuncture is not advised:

    • When someone has a hemophilic condition
    • When a  patient is pregnant – certain acupuncture points and needle manipulations should not be used during pregnancy
    • If a patient has a severe psychotic condition or is under the influence of drugs or alcohol

    Check out this link for a bit more information about the use of Acupuncture: Neck pain.

    ¬ Types of application of Acupuncture: Neck pain

    • Basic needling

      Needles are inserted to a depth of 4–25 mm and left in place for a period of time (from a few seconds to many minutes). There are often 6–12 needles (and sometimes more) inserted at different acupoints at the same time. The sensation is often described as a tingling or dull ache at the entry point. Many people say they feel very relaxed or sleepy, and some report increased energy levels afterwards.

    • Electro acupuncture (EA)

      A tiny focused electric current is applied to the skin at the acupoints or can be applied to the needle itself.

    If you would like to meet with a Registered Physiotherapist that is trained to do Acupuncture: Neck Pain,   please call PhysioNow today! Our experienced physiotherapists would be happy to help !

Peroneal tendinopathy

Peroneal tendinopathyPeroneal tendinopathy

Peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tendonitis is characterized by an aching pain and swelling in the perineal tendons. These are located in the lower, outside portion of the ankle. A tendon is soft-tissue that attaches a muscle to a bone. The muscles involved in this condition are the 2 peroneal muscles in the lower leg, called the peroneus longus and the peroneus brevis.

¬ Anatomy

​There are two peroneal tendons that run along the back of the fibula. The first is called the peroneus brevis. The term “brevis” implies short.  It is called this because it has a shorter muscle and starts lower in the leg. It then runs down around the back of the bone called the fibula on the outside of the leg and connects to the side of the foot.  The peroneus longus takes its name because it has a longer course. It starts higher on the leg and runs all the way underneath the foot to connect on the other side of the foot. Both tendons, however, share the major job of turning the ankle to the outside. The tendons are held in a groove behind the back of the fibula bone.

¬ Causes of Peroneal Tendonitis

♣ A sudden increase in weight bearing activities, particularly walking, running or jumping
♣ Inadequate or unsupportive footwear
♣ Muscle imbalances of the lower limb
♣ Poor lower limb biomechanics
♣ Incomplete rehabilitation following an acute ankle injury, such as an ankle sprain

¬ Symptoms of Peroneal Tendinopathy

♣ Gradual worsening pain over the outside of the ankle
♣ Pain during and/or after weight bearing activities
♣ Pain with turning the foot in and/or out
♣ Instability around the ankle when weight bearing

¬ Diagnosis

• A full examination from a physiotherapist can be all thats needed to diagnose peroneal tendonitis
• Patients with this condition usually experience pain behind the outside ankle during activities putting stress on the perineal tendons. Pain can also be noticed following these activities or following a rest period. This may be noticed especially upon waking in the morning. There may be swelling when the injury first happens. There will also be pain when testing resisted foot movements.  Stretches into various positions of the foot inversion, and resisted movements can cause pain behind the outside ankle.
• Diagnosis may be confirmed with an MRI scan or ultrasound investigation
• a diagnostic Ultrasound may be used for detecting all types of peroneal injuries.

ϖ What else could it be?:

Symptoms of peroneal tendinopathy mimic various other conditions of the ankle joint. So, before diagnosing peroneal tendinopathy we should rule out other possible injuries by doing the following tests:
• Ankle Sprain: ligament testing by the Physiotherapist
• Ankle fractures: special tests by the Physiotherapist
• Os trigonum syndrome: MRI, physiotherapy testing
• Chronical lateral ankle pain with other cause: MRI
• Longitudinal peroneal tendon tear: MRI
• Peroneal subluxation: ultrasonography, CT, MRI or peroneal tenography
• Flexor Hallucis longus tendon injury

¬ Physiotherapy rehabilitation

• Treatment for peroneal tendonitis includes a program of stretching, strengthening, mobilisation and manipulation. It also includes proprioceptive exercises, icing, ankle bracing or k-taping during contact sports. If symptoms are severe, a cast or ROM boot immobilization may be worn for 10-20 days. After symptoms resolve, you will begin a progressive rehabilitation programme along with a gradual increase to full activity.

• The use of a biomechanical ankle platform (BAPS), deep tissue friction massage, ultrasound electric stimulation can also be included in the physiotherapy
• Also, shock wave therapy (ESWT), acupuncture is used to treat tendinopathy. But there is only limited evidence from studies for these treatments.
• There is evidence for using manual therapy, specifically the lateral calcaneal glide.

If you have any further queries please call PhysioNow. Our experienced physiotherapists would be happy to help you. Call Today to get started 289-724-0448.!