Tag Archives: foot pain

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Patellofemoral pain syndrome

            Patellofemoral pain syndrome

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Patellofemoral pain syndrome happens when your knee cap does not track properly.  The knee joint consist of two joints.  The tibiofemoral joint which is between the two long bones in your leg and the second one is the patellofemoral joint.  This  is between the femoral condyle (end of thigh bone) and the knee cap. The cartilage on the back of the knee cap glides on the cartilage on the front of the condyles of the femur. The knee cap usually sits in a snug groove at the end of the thigh bone.

Knee movements are controlled by a number of muscles connected to the knee cap. Your  thigh muscle helps to stabilize the knee cap and enables it to move smoothly in the groove.  When this is pulled out of the groove, you can develop Patellofemoral pain syndrome.

Causes of Patellofemoral pain syndrome or Anterior knee pain

Patellofemoral pain syndrome, is one of the most  common causes of pain in the knee. Pain is usually felt under the knee cap.  This is where it glides on the femur/thigh bone. If you have patellofemoral pain syndrome, it hurts when you bend and straighten your knee . There are a number of factors which can cause the pain.

Common Causes of Patellofemoral pain syndrome

  • Weakness in the hip and thigh muscles-Weakness in the thigh muscles can cause increased load which may lead to pain. Pain in your knees will further limit the activity of your muscles and over time can cause further weakness. Weakness of the inner thigh muscle  will affect the movement of the knee cap as you do your normal activities. Weakness in your hip muscles also can affect activities like climbing stairs and walking.
  • Excessive loading or rapid increase in the load for muscles around the knee-Depending on your usual activities, your knee will have a level of activity that is tolerated by your joint. Rapid increases in loading of activity may lead to a highly irritable or sensitive joint. This can cause Patellofemoral pain syndrome.
  •  Posture or position of hip, knee and feet-Flat feet or excessive turning in of feet can change movement mechanics further up the leg and cause excessive strain in your knee cap.
  • Tight muscles around the knee-Tightness in the muscles can reduce the movement of your knee and affect  how your joint works . This will lead to excessive loading during activities. The common muscles that become tight are your hamstrings, Quadriceps, Iliotibial band and calf.
  • Previous injury or dislocation of knee cap
  • Desk top work, where a lot of sitting can cause pressure on the kneecap.
  • Irritation of fat pad around the knee
  • Tendinitis of quadriceps tendon
  • Bursitis around the knee
  • Osteoarthritis

When poor biomechanics are repeated with each step of your walking and running it may lead to a highly sensitive joint and Patellofemoral pain syndrome.

Symptoms

  • The onset of  knee cap pain is normally gradual rather than traumatic.
  • Pain at the front, back and sides of the knee with or without swelling.
  •  Bending and straightening of knee can cause pain.
  • Pain after prolonged sitting or when you keep the knee bent for longer periods of time.
  • Clicking or grinding when you bend or straighten your knee.
  • Pain when you go up and down the stairs, up hill /down hill, squatting, running or jumping.
  • Poor knee control or stiffness

Physiotherapy Treatment

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome treatment

  • Physiotherapy is the most effective treatment for short- and long-term management of Patellofemoral pain syndrome. Your Physiotherapist will fully assess you on your first visit to identify your functional limitation. They will also help to set goals and identify contributing factors for the pain.   They will  provide a customized rehabilitation program.
  • In the initial phase of rehabilitation, treatment is directed towards reducing the pain, swelling and muscle inhibition. To do this PhysioNow will  use electrotherapy modalities, acupuncture, rest, taping, gentle motion or joint mobilization and muscle setting exercises.
  • Once the pain and swelling reduces, treatment is focused towards modifying the  factors that have been identified as a cause for the problem.
  • Rehabilitation typically emphasizes increasing strength and pain free movements.  It also will address postural correction, improving the  stability of the pelvis, balance and functional abilities.
  • Stretching exercises to address the tight muscles and strengthening the weak muscles will improve your load tolerance.
  • Successful rehabilitation requires adherence to your exercise program .
  • You will also need to reduce the aggravating movements and slowly build the endurance and strength for those activities over time.
  • Prior to discharge you will be given a safe progression of exercises and functional activities.
  • For long term management, your foot and knee control will be assessed by your Physiotherapist.
  • As a result, you may require  custom foot orthotics to correct your foot position.
  • This will  help to improve foot and knee control.
  • Others might need a hip stabilization program and your Physiotherapist will be happy to discuss with you the long term rehabilitation plans if this is needed.Custom orthotics for Patellofemoral Pain syndrome

How long it will take to get better?

We expect to see improvements with Physiotherapy over a 3 to 6-month period.   Further improvements continue beyond this period. Adherence to your specific exercise program is important in maintaining the improvement. Most people will get back to their normal function with rehabilitation in the short term. Many patients can continue in their chosen activity during rehabilitation.  Some modification of activity may be all that is needed.

If you play sports, you will need to do sports specific exercises to ensure a safe return to sports. It is good to wear proper supporting footwear to help keep your feet in a good position.  This will  improve alignment of your knees.

How to book an appointment with a Physiotherapist at PhysioNow?

We have four Physiotherapy clinics of which three are located in Mississauga and one is in Etobicoke. You can call 289-724-0448 to book into any of these clinics  for an appointment with a Physiotherapist.

Most of the time we can arrange your initial visit on the same day in a location which is nearest to you. Your initial appointment will be a one to one 40-60 minute session with a Physiotherapist which includes treatment as well on the first day.

Your follow up appointments  will typically take  40 minutes.  Normally, we would recommend 2 to 3 sessions per  week depending on the factors identified on initial assessment, treatment plan and your goals.  If you have limited funding available, we will be happy to work with you to develop a home exercise program.

Please call today to get started on your treatment for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome at PhysioNow!

Fracture Rehabilitation

Fracture Treatments Mississauga & Etobicoke _ PhysioNow

Fracture types

Fracture Rehabilitation


Fractures are common injuries .  They can happen to people of all ages, from the very young to the very old.  The majority of fractures occur with trauma to the bone.  It could be  either from a fall or a blunt force.  Most people can readily feel that they have a broken bone. This is because the signs and symptoms can be very obvious.

Some of these indicators of Fracture are:

  • Swelling or bruising over a bone
  • Deformity of an arm or leg
  • Pain that gets worse with any movement or added pressure
  • Inability to put any weight through the injured area
  • Protruding bone through the skin (in the case of open fractures)

In some cases, however, fractures can be less obvious.  Some ankle fractures may look a lot like ankle sprains. You may not even know that it was a fracture until it shows up on an X-ray.

Spine Fractures

Fractures through the spine may feel a lot like back pain initially.  This is due to the  make-up of the spine.  Bony injuries to the back do not produce any of the obvious signs and symptoms .  However, one of the key components of a spinal fracture is that it occurs after some sort of trauma. This is most commonly a fall.  Therefore, if there is a traumatic event reported, the physiotherapist  will rule out any potential spinal fracture. They will  do a thorough assessment.  If the   Physiotherapist suspects a potential fracture, we will refer you back to your doctor to get X-rays done.

Fragility Fractures

In people with osteoporosis, fractures can happen with very minor stumbles or movements.  Osteoporosis is a condition where the bones become fragile or brittle from loss of bone.   Fractures associated with osteoporosis are called fragility fractures.  They occur due to the weakness of the bone itself.

If you have Osteoporosis, your bones can be injured with small traumas that would not normally affect the average person.  If you have  back pain and you have had trauma, the Physiotherapist will ask whether you have osteoporosis. This is to rule out potential fragility fractures.

Diagnostic tests for a Fracture

In any incident where there is a suspicion of a fracture, X-rays are necessary.  This will confirm the presence of the fracture, its exact location and severity.  However, in some cases, an X-ray may not be sensitive enough to show the fracture.   In these situations, if a fracture is still suspected, more sensitive tests like a CT, MRI or bone scan may need to be completed.

Fracture Classifications

There are 4 main classifications of fractures:

  • Displaced – the bone snaps into 2 or more parts and moves so that the two ends are not lined up straight.
  • Non-displaced – the bone breaks partly or all the way through, but the ends remain lined up
  • Closed – the bone breaks but there is no puncture wound in the skin
  • Open –the  bone breaks through the skin

Types of Fractures

There are also 7 different types of fractures to describe the specific nature of the break line:

  • Greenstick – incomplete fracture, where the broken bone is not completely separated
  • Transverse – the break is in a straight line across the bone
  • Spiral – the break spirals around the bone, common in a twisting injury
  • Oblique – the break is in a diagonal line across the bone
  • Compression – the bone is crushed, causing the broken bone to be wider or flatter in appearance
  • Comminuted – the break is in three or more pieces
  • Segmental – the same bone is fractured in two places, so there is a ‘floating’ segment of bone

Fracture Treatment

In terms of management of fractures, the treatment depends on the type of fracture.  The fractured ends of the bone must be set in their proper place and held there for the bone to heal properly.  This process is called reduction.

Fracture Repositioning

Most fractures are repositioned without the need for surgery. This  is called closed reduction.  Once the bones are positioned properly, the joint is casted .  The length of casting is usually 6 weeks.  This is how long it typically takes the fractured bones to heal.  There are circumstances where the period of casting may be either shorter or longer. This depends on the nature of the fracture.  If it is an ankle or foot fracture, the doctor may also recommend that you wear an aircast boot to stop your foot from moving.

PhysioNow carries a full supply of these aircast boots if you need one.

Open Reduction (Surgery) after Fracture

Open reduction (surgery)  is done for fractures that are more complicated. The repositioning of the bones wil be done with surgery in this case.   The surgeon will use screws and or plates to keep the bone fragments in proper position. This  allows for proper healing.   Following open reduction, you will have a period of immobilization .  The length of time for a fracture thathas required surgery will depend on the bone that was fractured. It also depends on  the severity of the fracture.  Also, depending on the fracture and the needs of the patient, the hardware may either be left in permanently or taken out with another surgery.  If removal of the hardware is necessary, it will happen once the fractured bone has completely healed.

Spinal and Rib Fractures

There are however some fractures that cannot be effectively immobilized such as spinal and rib fractures.  For these types of fractures, the affected area is protected with avoiding certain activities or postures.

Healing times for Fractures

In terms of healing times, most uncomplicated fractures take approximately 6 weeks for the bones to fuse.  Although medically, the fracture would have healed,  there may still be a lot of limitations. For fractures that are more complicated and required surgery, the healing times may be a little longer due the surgery.

Delayed Healing of Fractures

There are also some people who will heal at a slower rate because of various health conditions or medication use.  So, if you have diabetes, osteoporosis or are a long time user of prednisone, you may fall into this category.  Scaphoid Fractures also may have delayed healing because there is a poor blood supply to the bone.

Registered Physiotherapy after Fractures

Once the fracture itself is healed, there may still be some remaining problems from the injury.  Since the fracture would have been immobilized for several weeks, there will be a significant loss of movement and strength around the broken bone.

It is important to follow up with Physiotherapy for Fracture Rehabilitaton.  This helps to ensure that there can be a safe return to all previous activities.  A Registered Physiotherapist will be able to assess the limitations.  They will prescribe the necessary range of motion and  strengthening exercises and  then you can get back  to  all of your normal activities quickly!

PhysioNow Etobicoke and Mississauga

PhysioNow has highly trained Registered Physiotherapists on staff to help you after a Fracture.  We are open evenings and weekends to help meet your needs.  We also do direct billing to your insurance plan if you have one and if they allow us to do so on your behalf.

Call today to get started on your Fracture Rehabilitation!

Heat therapy

Heat and Cold therapy

How it works

When we apply Heat therapy, it improves circulation and blood flow to  that area due to increased temperature. Heat therapy can relax and soothe muscles and heal damaged tissue.

Heat therapy

Types

  • Dry Heat therapy includes sources like heating pads, dry heating packs, and even saunas. This heat is easy to apply.
  • Moist Heat therapy includes sources like steamed towels, moist heating packs, Theratherm heating pads that take moisture from the air, or hot baths. Moist heat may be slightly more effective as well as require less application time for the same results.

Contraindications

  • diabetes
  • dermatitis
  • vascular diseases
  • deep vein thrombosis
  • multiple sclerosis (MS)

 Heat is useful for relieving:

  • osteoarthritis
  • strains and sprains
  • tendonitis, or chronic irritation and stiffness in the tendons
  • warming up stiff muscles or tissue before activity
  • relieving pain or spasms relating to neck or back injury, including the lower back

Cold therapy

How it works

Cold therapy is also known as cryotherapy. It works by Louis- hunting reaction theory. When we apply Ice to an injured site, it reduces the blood flow by vasoconstriction. After some time, it causes vasodilatation and increases the blood flow to the area. This process goes on continuously. This reduces inflammation and swelling that causes pain, especially around a joint or a tendon. It can temporarily reduce nerve activity, which can also relieve pain.

Types of Cold Therapy

There are a number of different ways to apply cold therapy to an affected area. Treatment options include:

  • ice packs or frozen gel packs
  • coolant sprays
  • ice massage
  • ice baths

Cold treatment can help in cases of:

  • osteoarthritis
  • a recent injury
  • gout
  • strains
  • tendinitis, or irritation in the tendons following activity

Contraindications

  • people with sensory disorders
  • uncontrolled diabetes
  • You should not use cold therapy on stiff muscles or joints.
  • Cold therapy should not be used if you have poor circulation.

Here’s a general guide that helps you to decide which to use heat or ice : https://www.healthline.com/health/chronic-pain/treating-pain-with-heat-and-cold#cold-therapy

In General,  use ice for the first few days after an injury.  Beyond that, heat usually does the trick.  There is some evidence that suggests that using ice beyond the first few days can actually slow down injury healing.  It pushes away the healing agents that help you to get better.

If you have been injured and need advice or treatment, please call PhysioNow today.  We are always happy to help!

Peroneal tendinopathy

Peroneal tendinopathyPeroneal tendinopathy

Peroneal tendinopathy or peroneal tendonitis is characterized by an aching pain and swelling in the perineal tendons. These are located in the lower, outside portion of the ankle. A tendon is soft-tissue that attaches a muscle to a bone. The muscles involved in this condition are the 2 peroneal muscles in the lower leg, called the peroneus longus and the peroneus brevis.

¬ Anatomy

​There are two peroneal tendons that run along the back of the fibula. The first is called the peroneus brevis. The term “brevis” implies short.  It is called this because it has a shorter muscle and starts lower in the leg. It then runs down around the back of the bone called the fibula on the outside of the leg and connects to the side of the foot.  The peroneus longus takes its name because it has a longer course. It starts higher on the leg and runs all the way underneath the foot to connect on the other side of the foot. Both tendons, however, share the major job of turning the ankle to the outside. The tendons are held in a groove behind the back of the fibula bone.

¬ Causes of Peroneal Tendonitis

♣ A sudden increase in weight bearing activities, particularly walking, running or jumping
♣ Inadequate or unsupportive footwear
♣ Muscle imbalances of the lower limb
♣ Poor lower limb biomechanics
♣ Incomplete rehabilitation following an acute ankle injury, such as an ankle sprain

¬ Symptoms of Peroneal Tendinopathy

♣ Gradual worsening pain over the outside of the ankle
♣ Pain during and/or after weight bearing activities
♣ Pain with turning the foot in and/or out
♣ Instability around the ankle when weight bearing

¬ Diagnosis

• A full examination from a physiotherapist can be all thats needed to diagnose peroneal tendonitis
• Patients with this condition usually experience pain behind the outside ankle during activities putting stress on the perineal tendons. Pain can also be noticed following these activities or following a rest period. This may be noticed especially upon waking in the morning. There may be swelling when the injury first happens. There will also be pain when testing resisted foot movements.  Stretches into various positions of the foot inversion, and resisted movements can cause pain behind the outside ankle.
• Diagnosis may be confirmed with an MRI scan or ultrasound investigation
• a diagnostic Ultrasound may be used for detecting all types of peroneal injuries.

ϖ What else could it be?:

Symptoms of peroneal tendinopathy mimic various other conditions of the ankle joint. So, before diagnosing peroneal tendinopathy we should rule out other possible injuries by doing the following tests:
• Ankle Sprain: ligament testing by the Physiotherapist
• Ankle fractures: special tests by the Physiotherapist
• Os trigonum syndrome: MRI, physiotherapy testing
• Chronical lateral ankle pain with other cause: MRI
• Longitudinal peroneal tendon tear: MRI
• Peroneal subluxation: ultrasonography, CT, MRI or peroneal tenography
• Flexor Hallucis longus tendon injury

¬ Physiotherapy rehabilitation

• Treatment for peroneal tendonitis includes a program of stretching, strengthening, mobilisation and manipulation. It also includes proprioceptive exercises, icing, ankle bracing or k-taping during contact sports. If symptoms are severe, a cast or ROM boot immobilization may be worn for 10-20 days. After symptoms resolve, you will begin a progressive rehabilitation programme along with a gradual increase to full activity.

• The use of a biomechanical ankle platform (BAPS), deep tissue friction massage, ultrasound electric stimulation can also be included in the physiotherapy
• Also, shock wave therapy (ESWT), acupuncture is used to treat tendinopathy. But there is only limited evidence from studies for these treatments.
• There is evidence for using manual therapy, specifically the lateral calcaneal glide.

If you have any further queries please call PhysioNow. Our experienced physiotherapists would be happy to help you. Call Today to get started 289-724-0448.!

Foot Pain Treatment Mississauga

strong>Foot Pain Treatment Mississauga
Trending Now: Blue Jays’ Jose Batista on 15 day disabled list

Foot Pain Treatment Mississauga

Blue Jays’ Jose Batista hurt his big toe during a June 16 game against Philadelphia. After running into the outfield wall, Bautista had to leave the game early because of pain. An MRI showed that he had suffered a sprain of his left big toe. He had to be in a walking boot for the time being. It may seem like it’s an excessive treatment plan for just a simple sprain. In reality sprains can sometimes be more complicated than a fracture.

What is a Ligament?

A ligament is a soft tissue structure that connects two bones together. Ligaments do not receive a good blood supply like muscles or tendons and as a result, they cannot heal as well.

Types of Sprains

A sprain is defined as a stretch or tear of a ligament.
Furthermore, sprains can be classified into three groups based on the severity of injury. A grade I sprain means that there is mild damage to the ligament and the joint is stable. A grade II sprain means that there is a partial tear in the ligament and the joint is overall less stable or loose. The most severe type of sprain is classified as grade III and it means that the ligament has completely torn or ruptured and the joint has lost stability.

How can a Registered Physiotherapist help with Foot Pain treatment Mississauga?

A Registered Physiotherapist helps with all three types of sprains. The treatment for sprains starts with rest and reducing inflammation. Depending on the type of sprain, it may be necessary for immobilization in order for this to occur. For example a grade II sprain you can get a removable walking boot. A grade III sprain you can get a cast. Once inflammation is reduced and pain is better, treatment seeks to improve range of motion and strength and a return to activity or sport.

Since Jose Batista has been wearing a walking boot, it seems that his injury is at least a grade II. Considering the poor blood supply of ligaments and the severity of his particular sprain it is definitely best for him to be out of the game for at least 2 weeks. Proper foot pain treatment Mississauga in the early phase of injury is very important so that the ligament is well protected and given the best chance for healing. Once the walking boot comes off, his injury will be re-evaluated and the Blue Jays’ medical team will decide on his further treatment plan and eventual return to play.

Jose Bautista’s toe injury improving

If you have been injured, call PhysioNow today! They can help with Foot Pain treatment Mississauga!